Daily Dose of iQ: Carriers Remove 'Download Booster' from Galaxy S5

The Samsung Galaxy S5 hit store shelves today and although Samsung was touting a new feature called "Download Booster," three of the Big Four U.S. carriers (Verizon, AT&T and Sprint) have removed the feature.

T-Mobile is the only major U.S. carrier offering it. (See T-Mobile's Galaxy S5 web page.)

T-Mobile is the only major U.S. carrier offering the Download Booster on the new S5.

Download Blaster lets users access LTE and Wi-Fi simultaneously to obtain what Samsung calls "an unrivaled network experience!" (See above photo: a screenshot from the Galaxy S5 promo site.)

More specifically, the feature "allows you to combine your Wi-Fi and LTE connections during downloads of files larger than 30 MB," wrote Shawn De Cesari of Android Police (April 9). "The idea is that part of the file downloads over each connection interface, resulting in vastly improved download speeds over what would be achievable by each one individually."

Apparently AT&T didn't immediately respond to questions related to the Download Booster, but a spokesman told FierceWirelessTech (April 10): "We are evaluating Samsung's download booster feature. We thoroughly test new software, features and functionality to ensure that it meets our standards for a quality user experience."

Some users could inadvertently blow through their monthly data limit in 20 minutes. These 3 carriers did not want that.

What's the big issue here? Ars Technica's Ron Amadeo hit the nail on the head today, saying, "With a 20Mbps LTE connection and a 2GB monthly data limit, it's possible to blow through your monthly allowance in 15 minutes."

I don't think most users know that. And so, these three carriers -- in an attempt to avoid thousands of unhappy customers calling in asking why they inadvertently went over their monthly data limit and are being charged outrageous sums of money for it -- decided to nip this thing in the bud.