The Reality Facing Virtual Reality Adoption

Nov 11, 2015 — Garett Rogers
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In today’s mobile-consumed world, it is easy to understand why the experts are telling us mobile devices are eroding our relationships. The average teen sends 109.5 texts per day, which makes it easy to wonder if we are creating a generation of detached, socially inept zombies. 

With this week’s announcement from Samsung, the consumer version of Samsung’s Gear VR will now be available for purchase at your local Best Buy at a retail price of $99. That led me to wonder what the same experts have to say about the up and coming virtual reality technology and its effect on our social connections.

The average teen sends 109.5 texts per day, which makes it easy to wonder if we are creating a generation of detached, socially inept zombies. 

VR is an extremely promising next-gen computing platform that will need to overcome some significant challenges. To gain mainstream user adoption, it is going to take more than the idea -- it's going to take patience, and lots of money. Thankfully, the biggest players in this space are backed by companies like Facebook and Google that have already invested billions of dollars in the promise of VR technology, and who have also accepted the long-term nature of their investment.

It's still far too early for mainstream adoption of the technology -- only over-excited early adopters that are willing to strap something to their head are going to buy the first generation products. One of the largest barriers to adoption will actually be how it looks, which might generate a sentiment along the lines of, "I'd never wear one of those things". We all know how well the look of Google Glass went over…

Only over-excited early adopters that are willing to strap something to their head are going to buy the first generation products.

Virtual Reality isn't about what is happening right now, it is about what can happen in the future. People who have really been on the forefront of VR technology will all tell you that. The future of VR isn't one year away -- it's more likely 10 years away. When you consider VR 10 years from now, imagine a world where VR is so good that you can't actually tell the difference between VR and real life, and the stigma of only "nerds use VR" is gone.

Topics: Wireless Trends, Retail Marketing

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