How Good Service Becomes Great

May 02, 2016 — Zoran Kovacevic
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Most of us understand the importance of great service for sustained success in retail and any other industry, but only a few organizations truly know how to provide great customer service.

So, how do companies that achieve great service quality go about creating it in the first place? They start with this one fundamental realization: Great customer service can only be achieved at the intersection of service that customers enjoy receiving and service that employees enjoy providing.

When this happens, service is delivered from the heart; employees truly believe in the value of their service and take pride in the way they deliver it, each and every time.

Four key elements of GREAT customer service

Efficient

Every non-essential step eliminated from service delivery is a step towards a better service. For example, restaurants that deploy customer self-pay solutions eliminate guest wait time for their bill and payment terminal to be delivered. Guests simply pay from their smartphone with one tap and walk out.

Consistent

If your team is leveraging technology or data to wow the customers, be sure that it is repeatable. Customers will be back and might bring their friends too, so be sure whatever you do can be repeated every time. It is better not to engage in “limited-time service excellence activities” and aim for consistency by focusing on improving the elements of service that are repeatable.

Anticipatory

Great service providers prepare for likely scenarios before they play out. Having an umbrella bag dispenser ready before it starts raining, stocking up on reusable water bottles before a marathon weekend in the city and so on.

Detail Oriented

The smallest details can have the greatest impact on how service is perceived. Whether it is a new take on the packaging or free treats at a check out counter – small details go a long way… especially if they affect the first or the last couple of minutes in the service process. The first and last minutes tend to be the most memorable part of the guest experience.

Great service lives at the intersection of what customers and employees find enjoyable.

Companies are in the business of generating value for their stakeholders (profit) and a great service must not come at the expense of profits.  Many technological innovations offer low-cost opportunity for service improvement, but companies must always be mindful of how the new technology will impact employees. Remember, great service lives at the intersection of what customers and employees find enjoyable.

Topics: Customer Experience

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